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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
this program alone. >> and then this is not the only state because during this federal election there were two states that ended up on positive end of legalizing recreational marijuana. the other one being colorado. why do we not see a party there today? >> reporter: because they haven't made it legal yet. the governor there has to act before january 5th and then they will make it at some point legal to possess pot there as well. and then they'll have to go through the same process of setting up the rules to figure this out. advocates here firmly believe once you have the two states despite what the federal government may say, the cat will be out of the bag. jeangen other states will soon follow the tax revenues are one thing. they say it makes more sense rather than spending money on fighting petty crimes, use it to raise lots of money and use that money for education and other things. >> all right. thank you for that. clearly so many more questions, legal questions, and for that we'll skip over to our joey jackson, legal commentator who joins us live from atlanta now. i think one of the big
this election. it's not like the debt ceiling debacle in 2011 went over well with the american public. the american public was disgusted by it, it was brinks manship that people did not like to see, in a recession, they thought it endangered the economy, republicans also know that if you look at the polls and they look at the polls, that the public would blame them if we go over the fiscal cliff by a 2 to 1 margin. so i would say that right now, and i think even republicans would stipulate this, wolf. the president has the leverage here, i mean, republicans also know that if they were to go over the cliff that the tax cuts on the wealthy would increase. you could come back and undue the tax cuts on the middle class expiring. but the president's in a pretty good bargaining position here, which is why you see him sort of hold firm. >> what leverage do the republicans have? >> well, look, i think it -- they understand that for some liberals going over the cliff is okay, because liberals say, you know what, we get those defense cuts we wouldn't get otherwise, and they believe the public w
now. the american people re-elected him and they re-elected us. that's not a mandate to raise taxes. that's what house speaker john boehner told fellow republicans during a weekly meeting, signaling he will push back on president obama's demand for tax hikes on the rich when it comes to the fiscal cliff. but treasury secretary timothy geithner says the white house will not give in. >> no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest americans. remember it's only 2%. >> geithner adds the obama administration is, quote, absolutely prepared to go off the cliff, if necessary. joining me now is van jones, cnn contributor and former obama administration official. good morning. >> god morning to you. >> so, van, i guess my first question that's eatsy for geithner to say, we're perfectly willing to go off the fiscal cliff. that means a tax hike on middle class americans and maybe some of them are thinking this morning i'm not really so happy geithner said that. >> it might have been inartful for him to say it the way he said it. i think h
all know that was a kingmaker over the last two election cycles, a kingmaker on the tea party side. he is probably the person responsible for getting five tea party-backed members into the senate, including the most famous, marco rubio. he was backing marco rubio when established republicans were backing charlie crist. he says he can do more as an ideas now over at heritage, the oldest think tank on the conservative side. keep your eye on the governor of south carolina, she's a republican, it's up to her to pick a replacement to serve for two years who will she pick? that's what everybody wants to know. >> all right. thanks. >>> in egypt, opponents of president mohammed morsi are expected to take to the streets again. they were out in force last night in cairo chanting it was time for their president to resign. their anger was sparked two weeks ago when morsi granted himself sweeping powers. last night, morsi refused to rescind that decree, despite calls from proponents calling for him to do so. >>> the photographer who took a picture of a man standing on the subway tracks as a train a
type of constitution in which the people can have a say in electing their government. and where the countries then are put on a more stable footing. because once that goes, then what? so this is fantastically difficult. once you lift the lid off these very repressive regimes and out comes all this religious and tribal tension, we have to find a way to stabilizing the situation and bring the bloodshed to an end. >> elsewhere in the region, egypt right now, we're seeing these protesters, these anti-mohammed morsi protesters moving closer and closer towards the presidential pass palace in cairo. they're concerned about what morsi is doing as far as democracy in egypt. how worried are you about the situation in egypt? >> i think egypt is key to the region, so the answer is, you've got to be extremely worried when you see instability affecting egypt. this is, again, the birth pangs of proper democracy in some ways, but this struggle is immensely important. obviously what's important in these countries where they've moved to a democratic system is that there is a clear understanding t
? he was just re-elected. why couldn't he put together a package, a deal to avoid this disaster? >> i think this is a question of political leadership. and as that poll showed, there's no doubt that the president has the political advantage going into this. but at some point, and i think we're kind of getting close to it, the president has to be able to pivot and to say how do i turn this political advantage into a real policy accomplishment? and, wolf, i don't think you're going to do that with continued campaign style events like we just saw meeting with middle class families. okay. we get that. that occurred during the campaign. the white house has clearly gotten its message out. i think now there has to be a next step. you know, timing is everything in politics. and this is absolutely no different. what i'm getting from talking to some democrats on the hill is i think there's actually a lot of pent up anger and frustration among democrats how they feel republicans were obstructionist for the last four years. there's a little bit of payback going on here. they've got the advantage.
's suggestion that these are really big issues and very big decisions that should be made by our elected representatives in the senate and in the house. i'm not sure i like this idea that the president and the house majority leader, a republican, get to meet behind closed doors and get to make enormous fiscal decisions just between the two of them. >> do you think more would get done if they did this in front of the cameras? >> i actually think it should be one extreme or the other. they should either lock them behind closed doors until they get something done, let them hash it out, and then come out and announce the deal that we're not going to go over the fiscal cliff, or put everything on television. because i don't think i thought i would ever say this, but i do agree with grover nordqvist that this could give a hint about what each party is doing and who they are protecting. i think the democrats and the president would come out looking good on this, because from the very beginning they have said that they want to protect the middle class, extending middle class tax cuts. frankly, t
during the election. is he dialing back the rhetoric now? >> this was ryan's first speech since the election. both he and rubio seemed to be talking about how the republican party needs to be a party that's more inclusive, helping those in the lower associatio economic levels to rise up and prove their standing. both of them, ryan specifically talked about how he was proud of the campaign and that he mitt romney ran this past year. both men seemed to be critical of romney's controversial comments that 47% of the nation is beholding of the government and feels that the government is responsible to take care of them. take a listen to what both men said. >> both parties tend to divide americans into our voters and their voters. let's be really clear. republicans must steer far clear of that trap. we must speak to the aspirations and the anxieties of every american. >> i've heard it suggested that the problem is that the american people have changed. too many people want things from government. but i'm still convinced that the overwhelming majority of our people, they just want what
will get us jobs. >> your fellow georgian and your fellow republican saxby champ business who is up for re-election, he has committed himself to working with the democrats, to try to resolve some of the critical tax and spending issues. do you think he's played a constructive role here? >> well, what i do know is that what the voters on november 6th said is that we don't want ruling by one party. we want divided government. what they said is go back to washington and get to work. provide appropriate leadership and solve these challenges. so whether it is what is happening over in the senate or in the white house right now, i don't see the kind of leadership coming out of -- >> so back to saxby chambliss, sir, i'm not hearing praise. am i to read between the lines in what you're not saying is what you're saying? >> no, look, this takes two to tango. and we don't have the other side tangoing. you can't dance by yourself. when you do, it doesn't work. doesn't look very pretty. we need the administration to engage in a positive way, not a negative the way they are now. >> will you mount a primary chall
a dozen tea party-like conservatives elected. >> let me jump in, dana. i want to run through them because, you know, when we think senator demint we think of a tea party stronghold within the u.s. senate and helped and also hurt a number of republican candidates. who were they? >> reporter: that's right. great. let's start with the senators now. obviously, who he helped elect. this is the positive side of his millions and his work. marco rubio, pat toomey. very conservative, anti-tax, anti-government purists in the mold of jim demint. however, he also backed in republican primaries a number of republican candidates who simply were not electable according to the republican establishment and the establishment was right. for example, remember christine o'donnell, i'm not a witch, from delaware. ken buck of colorado. and others. so those are some of the reasons why he definitely has ruffled many a-feather with the party leaders and i have to tell you first thing i saw when the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell released a statement today was making the point that demint had, quote, unco
after the election. we saw the dow drop 300 points and suddenly everyone woke up and said we have to face this cliff and the question is, can they really address these issues in the next 24 days with the president heading for vacation and congress about to go home? it doesn't feel good. >> no. in terms we're waiting to find out if we're going to go over the cliff, but we're already seeing the effects of it, aren't we? a lot of americans without jobs and just the fear of going over the cliff is affecting it because it's affecting hiring. >> without a doubt. you wonder if it's affecting big business or small business. corporate ceos are simply sitting on their hands. you are seeing u.s. corporations with more money on their balance sheet than they had in years. the fact that they're facing more health care costs to pay out to their employees and they don't know what the tax climate is going to look for them. they're not growing their business and they're not creating innovation. it improves what they're doing in the equity markets and for small businesses, if big businesses don't do
affected by the fact that for the first time in this last election you have people going to the polls and actually voting to allow same-sex marriage as opposed to it coming from judges or legislators? >> i don't think justices sort of said the polls did "x" so i will do "y." in 1986, louis powell, the swing justice of his day, they had the first real gay rights case, and he said to his law clerk, you know, as they were sort of weighing the case, you know, i've never met a gay person. i've never met a homosexual. what is that like? now, he didn't know that law clerk himself was homosexual, but that was what the world was like in 1986, that a worldly, intelligent man could have thought that he'd never met someone who was gay. now, even the conservatives on the court couldn't possibly express a sentiment like that. and that's just reflected in how the court acts. >> what do you think -- are is there any way to read the tea leaves on this? >> based on my experience in the health care case, i am going to not do a lot of predictions because, you know, wrong is wrong. but anthony kennedy has
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)